UoL Library Blog

Develop, debate, innovate.

Theses are the days we remember

Posted by gazjjohnson on 13 November, 2008

Just run the first of the e-theses submission sessions on behalf of Keith and Hywel, in this case to 3rd year education PhD students.  Seemed to go quite well, despite the mix of jet lagged and baffled students – the Stables rooms are not the easiest places to find.  Mind you the lighting could do with some tweaks as well, as cast a very soporific sheen over the room.

They seemed reassured by my repeated statements about this being goodfor them, their visibility and their careers.  I also laid the library/university’s helpfulness on with a trowel, which I think was the real key to assuaging their worries.

The questions were mostly about points the late comers had missed, though one overseas student was clearly concerned still by the copyright issues.  Not so much third party, but just the general Open Access unease many academics still have.  I did my best to salve his worries, but encouraged him to get in touch with the LRA to talk it over in greater and more specific details.

But all in all a good start, and doubtless a session all we Information Librarians will be repeating in the coming months.

Slides are  at: http://tinyurl.com/55l6kq

4 Responses to “Theses are the days we remember”

  1. sarahw9 said

    I need an update on LRA generally, in fact was thinking of some kind of visit to the LRA folk.

    The general unease is about fear others will pick their ideas?

  2. gazjjohnson said

    Actually I talked a lot about plagerism, and the studies (see Fosblog and any email from Steven Harnad [if you dare] for details)that have demonstrated how OA stuff is better protected from being copied.

    But this particular student seemed to assume that LRA/Theses was a dark archive not Open Access to all…

  3. jobadge said

    Can you let me about the plagiarism issues? I am part of the graduate board of studies looking at the issue on etheses. ta.
    Jo

  4. gazjjohnson said

    Can do Jo I’ll track ’em down out of my archive, but in the meantime have a search of FosBlog http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/fosblog.html should reveal a few things.

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