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Archive for the ‘Referencing’ Category

Mendeley Institutional Edition

Posted by selinalock on 25 April, 2012

Mendeley Institutional Logo 

 

Mendeley (the academic reference manager and social network site) have partnered with library suppliers Swets to produce the Mendeley Institutional edition, and I had a webex meeting with product manager Simon Litt to find out more.

Mendeley End User Edition

The end user edition is bascially what is already available for free from Mendeley:

  • Desktop reference management software, which allows you to organise nd cite a wide range of reference typs.
  • Desktop software also allows you to upload, read and annotate PDFs.
  • Desktop links to a web-based system which allows you to synch and share your references.
  • Web system also works as an academic social network with groups etc.
  • 1GBWeb space, 500 MBPersonal, 500 MBShared, 5 Private groups, 10 Users per group

Mendeley Institutional Edition

  • Upgrade to end user edition (normally £4.99 per month) to
    • 7GBWeb space, 3.5 GBPersonal, 3.5 GBShare, 10 Private groups, 15 Users per Private group
  • Upload a list of library holdings (journals) to allow fulltext access for institutional members.
  • Turn on institutional OpenURL.
  • Institutional groups – any mendeley users signed up with an institutional email will automatically be added to institutional group & can add further members.
  • Analytics – who’s publishing and reading what.
  • Reading tab – See what your users are reading (adding to Mendeley) by journal title and compare with library holdings.
  • See most read/popular articles.
  • Publishing tab – where your members are publishing.
  • Impact tab – worldwide usage of your members published articles e.g. most read.
  • Compare your institution with other Mendeley institutions with regards to impact/how read your institutions articles are.
  • Social tab – what groups your users are in.

The main thrust of the institutional edition is the analytic functions that Swets have worked with Mendeley to add. The pricing models are currently being worked on so no idea what the price this would be.

When I previously reviewed Mendeley (alongside RefWorks, EndNote, CiteULike & Zotero) in 2010/11 the main issue with using it an institutionally recommended product was that the desktop software needed admin access to be installed and updated regularly on user machines. As far as I can tell this issue hasn’t been addressed in the institutional edition, as user would still download the free desktop software from the Mendeley site or just use the wbe interface.

My questions surrounding the institutional edition would be…

  • Would it be able (be accepted as) a replacement for EndNote and/or Refworks? As there seems little point in getting the institutional edition for the analytics if our users were not using the desktop/web reference software.
  • Do the analytics give us enough “added-value”?
  • How does the analytical information compare with other types of bibliometris from IRIS or InCites?
  • Are the analytics only going to be useful to certain disciplines as they currently only look at journal articles and titles?
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Posted in Referencing, Research Support, Web 2.0 & Emerging Technologies | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Teaching reference management

Posted by knockels on 22 June, 2010

Or perhaps, teaching using reference management.  I went yesterday to the second Innovations in Reference Management event, organised by the TELSTAR project, in Birmingham.   It was all very useful and interesting, but a couple of things caught my eyes and ears.  Here is one.

Helen Curtis, of the University of Wolverhampton, spoke about the University’s inclusion of digital literacy in the list of attributes of a graduate, and the opportunities that this afforded the Library.   I was very interested in how they taught and assessed reference management, trying to concentrate not on teaching one particular tool but on more generic skills.   

One example was an assessment that got the students looking at a list of references and transferring the data into EndNote.  This needs them to be able to identify what the parts of a reference are, and shows them which fields in EndNote are the most important. 

Another example was where students had to include in their project a piece of writing that reflected on their use of information sources, and this had to be submitted alongside the project and the actual EndNote library.    No more finding all the references at the last moment to make sure that no one thinks you are plagiarising!

A third example was the use of virtual reading groups (using EndNote Web).   Students had to add material to a shared folder and then add summaries and comments.  They had to indicate what they had been able to find out about the authors, as well as how they would describe the information source, as well as why the source was useful.   (This reminded me of the exercise that Sarah and I were involved in with Alan Cann, where second year biological science students had to use Cite U Like to store relevant papers and their own appraisal of those papers).

Of course, in the midst of this the students are learning the use of a particular software tool, but they are seeing it in a larger context.

Posted in Referencing, Training | Tagged: , , | 2 Comments »

Innovations in Reference Management Part 3

Posted by selinalock on 25 January, 2010

Moving Targets: the role of web preservation in supporting sustainable citation (Richard Davis & Kevin Ashley)

This was a rather different talk to most of the others at the event as it was looking more at the question of how we can cite the preserved version of ephemeral type of data, such as blogs, that we often see on the web these days.

  • Some web preservation already happening: URI/DOI/Handles & other solutions, Wayback machine and UK Webarchive.
  • Are we educating people to use links to sustainable archives/ Should we be recommending linking to the UK Webarchive version and not the original version?
  • Used the example of citing a blog post that might disappear.
  • Will our “collections” look different in future, will they be blog type posts rather than journal articles or books?
  • Talked about the JISC project ArchivePress which allows you to use a RSS feed to create a preserved blog archive: this will allow Universities to create their own repository of blogs. For example, it could integrate with Research Repositories that use applications like DSpace. Should the Leicester Research archive be looking into preserving research blogs as well as other research outputs?
  • Heidelberg University and others have created a Citation Repository for transitory web pages: this was specifically to deal with the problem that their researchers were having when researching China, due to the volatile nature of the Chinese internet. There might be rights issues with this approach but many of the original web pages had disappeared.
  • Should we be teaching people about sustainable resources/publishing as part of our information literacy efforts?
  • Can argue that citing a URL is like citing the shelfmark of a book in a library, as it’s the location of the information rather than the information itself. Should we be looking for a better citation system?
  • Possible solutions: Institutions can offer archive mechanisms, authors need to use archive mechanisms, if a blog is being preserved than it needs to expose that permanent citable link for people to use (e.g. ArchivePress link) and permalinks should be a bit more “perm”!

Help me Igor – taking references outside traditional environments (Euan Adie, Nature.com)

Euan gave an overview of some of the projects they are working on as part of the Nature.com remit:

  • Looked at how referencing might be achieved if you were using GoogleWave as a collaborative tool to write articles etc.
  • Decided to create a 3rd party GoogleWave widget called Igor.
  • Igor lets you fetch references from Connotea or PubMed and insert them into the Wave: it does this by typing in a command in Wave.
  • Igor uses an open API to retrieve data (XML or RDF) and is only a proof of concept widget at the moment. it is OpenSource and people are welcome to develop it further.
  • Euan did point out that the formats that most reference software uses (RIS/BIBtex) are not very easy to use with web APIs.
  • Mentioned ScienceBlogs: an initiative to aggregate well known science blogs through Nature.com. E.g. finds if blogs link to Nature articles (via html, DOI, PubMed): blogs already comment on articles when they’re published so Nature wants to link the comments/blog posts to the articles.
  • Have a API available that allows you to feed in am article DOI and see what blogs aggregated through Nature.com mention that article.
  • Mobile devices: have made Mac app Papers available on iPhone. thinks people are not as likely to read articles on mobiles but save the reference for later instead.
  • Nature.com always willing to experiment and collaborate with other projects.

Posted in Collection management, Meetings, Referencing, Technology & Devices, Web 2.0 & Emerging Technologies | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Innovations in Reference Management Part 1

Posted by selinalock on 19 January, 2010

So, on Thursday January the 14th I made my way down a very foggy M1 to the Innovations in Reference Management Event, hosted by the JISC Telstar Project in Milton Keynes. 

I’m going to break the event down into a couple of posts, so this first one deals with the interesting things people are doing with RefWorks.

Telstar Project: Integrating References into VLE: Moodle & RefWorks (Owen Stephens and Jason Platts)

 The aim of this part of the project was to bring together references in a standard, structured format which could be inserted into course materials, and various parts of the VLE. It also allowed students to download, copy of annotate references so that they could become more active participants.

All OU material and sites have to sue the standard OU Harvard style for references, which has been made available via RefWorks. What bliss, to only have one style for the whole University!  We can only dream…

Reference links with the moodle course site have persistent, dynamic links via OpenURL/SFX where possible, or no links if it’s a printed resource. The students can select the references and export into their moodle, MyStuff area, or RefWorks or collaborative area or download as RIS or RefWorks XML content.

Constructing the reference lists: option in moodle to import the references from a standard data set, which then interacts with RefWorks to produce a OU Harvard style reference list. the same can be done via a RefShare RSS feed. The same system is used for inserting references into OU structured course content using a Word template.

MyReferences moodle module: powered by RefWorks. A “RefWorks Light” that allows students to use RefWorks functionality without leaving the VLE.  So they can create bibliographies within moodle as well. All the data in MyRefs automatically appears in their RefWorks account as well, in case they want to use the full RefWorks functionality at any time (e.g. the cite’n’write options). Staff have extra functionality which allows the creation of shared accounts and reference lists.

To allow students to share references within te VLE they can export them from a reading list to the collaborative area. This creates script which they can then cut and paste into forums etc and it will then be rendered in the MyRefs format to allow others users to select/export etc.

I thought this looked fab for OU students, so they can easily get all the references from their course into their own area and create bibliographies in the OU style, which could be cut and pasted into their assignments. Obviously not an option for Leicester as it is based aroud Moodle modules and no mention of Blackboard equivalent.

Feed me weird things: Using RefWorks RSS for new title lists (Paul Stainthrop, University of Lincoln)

Their catalogue doesn’t have an option to create lists of new resources bought/received so they were still creating manual/printed lists for their users. Paul looked for a way to do this electronically using existing or free resources.

Solution: Subject librarians imported new book data into RefWorks ~ shared the RefWorks folder and created RSS feed ~ yahoopipes was then used to process the feed (takes the ISBN & scrapes Amazon for product description), it formats the html and inserts the book cover from Amazon, creates link back to library catalogue for the title & creates a “clean” RSS feed ~ Googlefeedburner then used to create a short URL & allow email subscription to feed & gives usage stats ~ used Feed2JS (freeware) to create a java script that could be embedded in Blackboard etc.  also includes buttons fro links to services such as export to RefWorks, Catalogue, GoogleBooks & xISBN service (allows notification of new eds).

This looked like a nifty and ingenious solution for a service short on time and resources. Paul was concerned about the stability of the service and whether he’s created an expectation that the same thing could be done for journal table of contents!

With our current RefWorks subscription here at UoL we can’t create shared folders or RSS feeds because we don’t have the RefShare functionality, which is a separate subscription for us early adopters! All newer RefWorks subcription get it included (like Lincoln). In response to me asking about RefSahre at the event one of the RefWorks reps told me that all subscriptions should include RefShare in future, so *fingers crossed* we’ll get extra functionality to play with in future.

The rep also confirmed that the license now includes alumni use – which means any student who creates a RefWorks account while studying with us can continue to use that account free of charge after they leave as long as the University still has a subcription. Yay! Just waiting for official email confirmation before advertising this to students.

Posted in Meetings, Referencing, Research Support, RSS | Tagged: , , , , , | 5 Comments »

Finding Journal Abbreviations

Posted by gazjjohnson on 11 December, 2009

A couple of good sites that are worth passing on:

All that JAS: Journal Abbreviations: http://www.abbreviations.com/jas.asp

CalTech Journal Abbreviations: http://library.caltech.edu/reference/abbreviations/

Thanks to my team for searching and suggesting them!

Posted in Referencing, Subject Support | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

RefMobile

Posted by knockels on 29 May, 2009

We promote RefWorks widely to students and staff here at Leicester, as one of the two reference management tools that the University supports.   RefMobile is a way to access your RefWorks account on a mobile device.

I have a pay as you go internet enabled mobile phone, and had no problem accessing RefMobile on it.   I assume therefore that owners of jazzier devices will also have no problem, but it would be interesting to hear if that is true or not!

There is a “RefMobile” link prominent on the RefWorks home page, but it seems to try to download something onto your machine, not sure what.   But the RefWorks help pages on the subject are helpful, and so this is what I did:

On my  mobile I went to www.refworks.com/mobile, where I was asked for the group code and my account details.   These are remembered for 14 days, apparently.   I was impressed – you can see all your folders, and the “SmartAdd” feature enables you to find references quickly using a DOI, an ISBN, or a PubMed ID, and download them.  I searched for one using a PubMed ID and was able to save the reference to my RefWorks account, and I could see it using RefWorks on the web (I was logged in already on the web, and so had to log out and in again).   

In theory this would be a quick way to record details of a reference from a colleague or other source, although you would of course need a PMID or similar reference, and it might take a few minutes to get into RefMobile, and into your account.   Still impressed, though!

Posted in Mobile technologies, Referencing, Research Support, Technology & Devices | 6 Comments »

Cite your tweets

Posted by gazjjohnson on 27 April, 2009

Spotted on Twitter – a useful blog posts on citing tweets (let’s leave aside why you’d want to cite them, and any questions over their academic validity shall we)

How to cite twitter posts in APA style

What amuses me is that makes the reference longer that the tweet in the first place!  And does one use the authors real name or twitter name to ID?  Personally I’d favour the latter, since my Twitter ID is actually a discretely different persona to my RL one.

But at least now you can have a go at capturing those moments of fleeting tweeting brilliance if you like!

Posted in Referencing | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Postgraduate sessions – a bit of a review

Posted by gazjjohnson on 20 November, 2008

Whilst the four sessions I’ve run recently for PhD students haven’t been packed, going on the feedback they were much appreciated by those who attended them.  I’ve just gone through the feedback for the sessions and I’ve been rather pleasantly surprised.

  • Advanced database searching fo Science Postgraduates
    • Overall, this session was
      • Very good 71%
      • Good 29%
    • This session was
      • Just the right length 86%
      • Too long 14%
  • Bibliographic Databases & Keeping up to date for Postgraduate Students
    • Overall, this session was
      • Very good 86%
      • Good 14% 
    • This session was
      • Just the right length 83%
      • Too short 17%

Not quite sure if I’d want to do more than 2 hours on RefWorks and EndNote AND keeping up to date!  But those aren’t bad results all in all.  I was very pleased that the elements on Open Access along with searching and using quality OA resources were especially popular, with students asking for more.  As they say ABM*! Best student review quote has to be:

“Excellent session, most useful one so far! All very useful and interesting.”

As for stuff they didn’t like…most said “Nothing” or “All things were necessary” which is very rewarding to hear.  On personal reflection there are a few elements I want to revise before running these sessions again; changing location to a smaller room given the numbers might be one I’ll try pursuing!  I also think I want to make use of a digital format possibly for the workbooks, as I estimate I’ve spent about 5 hours just photocopying and stapling materials for these 4 sessions alone.

Slides are available for those interested – Databases session & Bibliographic session

My one worry is that elements of what I was teaching may have overlapped a little to a lot with some of the session Keith, Selina and probably even Stuart have been teaching.  But then since the whole programme seemed to emerge from the fog fully formed without much input from our end, perhaps that is one thing we now need to look at in retrospect.  So the big question – is there going to be a course review meeting, and how do we ensure that the library is represented on it this time?

*ABM = Always Be Marketing

Posted in Open Access, Referencing, Research Support, Training | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Wherefore out thou projector?

Posted by selinalock on 19 November, 2008

I taught a new session on RefWorks to 30 third year Computer Scientists yesterday, which didn’t quite go to plan, as there was no projector to be found in the lab. I quickly realised that trying to teach software without the ability to demo certain actions is quite hard!

I ended up getting small groups around my computer to demo certain bits and the students picked it up quite quickly. Though there were initial groans when I told them to login to Windows instead of linux.

I also realised a few minutes into the session that several of the students would be writing up their projects in LaTeX and so the whole Word plugin side to RefWorks was irrelevant to them.

If I do the session next year then I think I will:

  1. Make sure there’s a projector!
  2. Give an overview of how to reference to start the session.
  3. Ensure they login to Windows at the start of the session.
  4. Give them the option to learn about RefWorks.

Posted in Referencing, Subject Support, Training | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

EndNote X1

Posted by knockels on 17 October, 2008

We have upgraded from EndNote 9 to EndNote X1 (meaning 11, presumably).  EndNote 9 has now gone from the University network. 

Selina updated the Library’s EndNote information. I am maintaining a post on my own blog to relay things that I have discovered while helping people with the change – how to install the Word toolbar, where have all the customised styles gone, where to find the Word toolbar in Word, that sort of thing.

Posted in Referencing, Research Support, Subject Support | Tagged: , , | 2 Comments »

Papers for Mac

Posted by gazjjohnson on 8 October, 2008

Emm Raven, over in Chemistry, asked me this morning if I knew of a service called Papers for Mac.  In her words “It works just like itunes. Basically, it organises all your pdfs files of papers in the same way that itunes does. And it imports libraries from endnote as .xml files.

http://www.apple.com/downloads/macosx/math_science/papers.html

Not being a Mac (nor indeed iTunes) user I’ve never touched the thing – but wondered if any of you folks have made use of it, and if so what have been your experiences?  Does it, as Apple put it, “give you a completely new workflow for reading scientific articles” and is there a OS agnostic version?

Posted in Referencing, Research Support | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

What international students are letting themselves in for

Posted by knockels on 25 September, 2008

Interesting read in the Guardian, by a newspaper editor from India, who is also on the faculty of a journalism college in Chennai.

He argues that the large number of international students from China and India may trip over some of the differences between higher education practice in those countries and the UK.   He cites his own experience in India of institutions not teaching academic skills like referencing, study skills or time management.  This could put burdens on staff at UK institutions, who may have to fill in those gaps.  And universities (in the UK, is the implication, though I am not sure) may be ignoring their own guidelines on English language requirements for overseas students, leading to students not being able to cope with their course. 

Whether these things are widespread or not I do not know, but even if they occur only in some places, there are implications for us as librarians working with international students.   I have noticed with masters’ courses in biomedical sciences that a lot, even perhaps a majority, or students are international students, and that they have variable levels of English (although infinitely better than any language that I can manage) and computer skills.    If the practices in this article are widespread, then we can expect that to continue, and we can expect an impact on things like referencing skills.

Posted in Referencing, Research Support, Subject Support, Training | Tagged: , | 3 Comments »