UoL Library Blog

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Posts Tagged ‘learning’

Learning and Teaching in the Sciences Unconference

Posted by gazjjohnson on 22 May, 2009

DSC01084This morning I went off to the Learning and Teaching in The Sciences Unconference.  What is an conference?  It’s one where rather than a set agenda, the participants come together and draw one up.  Ideally you run it over a day or two and aim to have real outputs at the end, but we had just a few hours.  Normally the LTS Conference spans an afternoon or so with invited speakers.  This year this wasn’t possible, but there was still a demand to meet and look at our teaching and a learning activities across the sciences. 

The focus was on assessment, and after voting on the aspects we wanted to look at fractioned off into smaller groups.  I was in a group looking at the benefits to students and staff.  After flying the flag for information literacy we came to a rough conclusion that whilst they may grumble about it, and focus on the final grade; assessment has real appreciable and demonstrable benefits to students, staff and the institution – with especial focus on the employ-ability and respect of our graduates.

We had a feedback session and then broke into new groups.  This time I was looking at work placed assessment and placement.  I spent a year in industry as part of my degree, and it was a wonderful terrifying, intensive and rich learning experience.  We didn’t have as much time here, so we perhaps didn’t dig down as far as we might have hoped.  We then lunched and discussed the session. 

One of the best outputs was uncovering one of my Chemistry academics as a tweeter and I’ve been following up on some of the discussions with @wozzza already.  More than that?  Well I hope to see unconferences like this more often at UoL.  They take less planning, and other than refreshments need little more than a room and a few hours of people’s times.  But the reinforcement of old networks and the generation of new linkages can only be of considerable benefit to the university.  Thanks to my novel networks we made the http://scienceleicester.wordpress.com/, what will come from today?!

DSC01086Well for one I introduced Alan Cann to Belbin analysis; which he’d never heard of; so felt justly smug for a few fleeting seconds.

Hopefully there will also be other blogs and formal reports too, to try and share this expertise and experience further.  A big thanks to Stu Johnson of Student Developmentfor organising and facilitating the day.

The session also used a twitter-back channel discussion which we projected to the screen.  As we were all using phones and tiny portable devices there was none of that regular clattering you might have heard in a computer lab.  Worked quite well, as a few of us were documenting the session, and we also got quite a few comments from external people interested.  And we trended on Twitter too!  You can follow the twitter feed of discussions here

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Posted in Staff training, Subject Support, Wider profession | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

M People and M-learning

Posted by gazjjohnson on 12 February, 2009

A blog that might be worth reading is this one from Vicky Owen, over at Liverpool John Moores University.  She’s working on a project looking at M-learning in libraries, something that might well tie into some of our aspirations on QR codes.  The project’s coming to an end, so it’ll probably make for interesting reading over the next month or so.

Posted in Wider profession | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Session for 1st Year Computer Scientists

Posted by selinalock on 21 August, 2008

As previously mentioned I’ll be doing a new session for 1st year computer scientists.

This is my draft session so far, feedback encouraged!

CO1007 Session: Finding, Collecting & Sharing Resources
• Session for approx 50 1st yr Com Sci students in wk 5 of term, based in a computer lab.
• To be taught via a wiki – a strategy used effectively by a colleague at Loughborough with 1st yr Comp Sci students.
o http://jil.lboro.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/JIL/article/view/RA-V1-I3-2007-1
• Wiki will allow online interaction between students during the session and hopefully promote reflective thinking.
• Library catalogue will be covered in normal 1st yr induction (10am Fri 3rd Oct), so this session will concentrate on online resources.

Activities/Prompts within the Wiki:

1. Wikipedia – what is it good for?
• Go to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page and search for Computer Ethics
• What do you find useful about Wikipedia? What are the problems with Wikipedia?
• You may find it useful to read – strengths, weaknesses & article quality in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:About#Strengths.2C_weaknesses.2C_and_article_quality_in_Wikipedia • Post a Pro & Con to the wiki
o E.g. Pro: covers a huge amount of topics
o E.g. Con: only covers some topics superficially

2. What’s the best search engine for you?
• Use your favourite search engine to find information on plagiarism in computer science
• Why do you like this search engine? Did you find some useful results?
• Post your findings to the wiki
• Now try a different search engine, such as scholar.google.co.uk or www.scirus.com, which are scholarly and scientific search engines.
• How did these search engines compare to your favourite? Did you find different results?
• Post your findings to the wiki

3. How do you collect and share resources with friends?
• Create an account on http://delicious.com/ using your CFS username, in order to save links that are useful for this course.
• Go to my delicious account http://delicious.com/STLock (need to create) and add me to your network.
• You will see I have tagged a number of resources CO1007, which I think you will find useful for this course.
• Add a resource you think will be useful to your account and tag it CO1007
• Post your delicious account name to the wiki so that others can add you to their network and vice versa
• Do you think it will be useful to build up a list of shared resources like this? Do you think you might use it for other courses?
• Post your thoughts/comments to the wiki
• Delicious is the most popular, but not the only, social bookmarking tool available. There are others that are aimed at researchers and scientists, such as http://www.citeulike.org/ and http://www.connotea.org/

4. An exercise on Google Reader?
5. An exercise on recommended journals?

Posted in Subject Support, Training, Web 2.0 & Emerging Technologies | Tagged: , , , , , , | 5 Comments »