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Posts Tagged ‘leicester’

LRA – Most accessed items March 2012

Posted by gazjjohnson on 2 April, 2012

As usual here are the most popular items on LRA last month.

  1. Financial Development, Economic Growth and Stock Market Volatility: Evidence from Nigeria and South Africa (Ndako, Umar Bida)
  2. The propagation of VHF and UHF radio waves over sea paths (Sim, Chow Yen Desmond)
  3. Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change (Sandell, Richard)
  4. Writing up and presenting qualitative research in family planning and reproductive health care (Pitchforth, Emma et al)
  5. Facebook, social integration and informal learning at university: ‘It is more for socialising and talking to friends about work than for actually doing work’ (Madge, Clare et al) 
  6. Pragmatic randomized trial of antenatal intervention to prevent post-natal depression by reducing psychosocial risk factors (Brugha, Traolach S. et al) 
  7. The challenges of insider research in educational institutions: wielding a double-edged sword and resolving delicate dilemmas (Mercer, Justine) 
  8. An efficient and effective system for interactive student feedback using Google+ to enhance an institutional virtual learning environment (Cann, Alan James) 
  9. The Development of Nurture Groups in Secondary Schools (Colley, David Rodway) 
  10. Mobile technologies and learning (Naismith, Laura et al)

Don’t forget if your research publications are on LRA, that they can be accessed by anyone in the world, unlike those behind publisher paywalls.  Simply by sharing the unique identifier (handle) in an email list, on webpage or via social networks you will find that your access rates and citations should climb yet further.

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Posted in Leicester Research Archive | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Top 10 LRA Items for December 2011

Posted by gazjjohnson on 4 January, 2012

Here are the most accessed articles on the LRA for the month of December 2011.

  1. The BIOMASS mission: Mapping global forest biomass to better understand the terrestrial carbon cycle (Le Toan, T. et al)
  2. The propagation of VHF and UHF radio waves over sea paths (Sim, Chow Yen Desmond)
  3. Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change (Sandell, Richard)
  4. Financial Development, Economic Growth and Stock Market Volatility: Evidence from Nigeria and South Africa (Ndako, Umar Bida)
  5. Optimal Number of Response Categories in Rating Scales: Reliability, Validity, Discriminating Power, and Respondent Preferences (Preston, Carolyn C. et al)
  6. The List of Threatening Experiences: a subset of 12 life event categories with considerable long-term contextual threat (Brugha, Traolach S. et al)
  7. Measuring the efficiency of European airlines: an application of DEA and Tobit Analysis (Fethi, Meryem Duygun et al)
  8. The Introduction of Virtual Learning Environment e-Learning Technology at a Sixth Form College: A Case Study (Osadiya, Taye Timothy)
  9. Educational Leadership: an Islamic perspective (Shah, Saeeda J.A.)
  10. Facebook, social integration and informal learning at university: ‘It is more for socialising and talking to friends about work than for actually doing work’ (Madge, Clare et al)

Posted in Leicester Research Archive, Open Access | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Top LRA Items for September 2011

Posted by gazjjohnson on 5 October, 2011

Here they are, the most heavily accessed articles on the LRA from the past month (and with a newly added article topping the list as well).

  1. Reflective Social Portfolios for Feedback and Peer Mentoring (Cann, Alan James et al)
  2. Financial Development, Economic Growth and Stock Market Volatility: Evidence from Nigeria and South Africa (Ndako, Umar Bida)
  3. The propagation of VHF and UHF radio waves over sea paths (Sim, Chow Yen Desmond)
  4. High Performance Work Practices: Work Intensification or ‘Win-win’? (Sparham, Eimer et al)
  5. Optimal Number of Response Categories in Rating Scales: Reliability, Validity, Discriminating Power, and Respondent Preferences (Preston, Carolyn C. et al)
  6. Facebook, social integration and informal learning at university: ‘It is more for socialising and talking to friends about work than for actually doing work’ (Madge, Clare et al)
  7. Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change (Sandell, Richard)
  8. The electrodeposition of composite materials using deep eutectic solvents (El ttaib, Khalid)
  9. Creative industries and cultural development: still a Janus face? (Gibson, Lisanne)
  10. Measuring the efficiency of European airlines: an application of DEA and Tobit Analysis (Fethi, Meryem Duygun et al)

And don’t forget you can follow all the new additions to the LRA on twitter – UoLLRA.

Posted in Leicester Research Archive, Research Support | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Leicester Research Archive: Top items June 2011

Posted by gazjjohnson on 5 July, 2011

Here I am again with the list of the most frequently accessed items on Leicester’s research publications repository during the month of June 2011.

  1. How can autistic intelligence be recognised and accommodated within an inclusive education framework? (Jacobs, Barbara Helen)
  2. Evaluating Repository Annual Metrics for SCONUL (Johnson, Gareth James)
  3. The propagation of VHF and UHF radio waves over sea paths (Sim, Chow Yen Desmond)
  4. ‘You’ve gotta love the plastic!’ An ethnographic study of Ultimate Frisbee in the UK (Griggs, Gerald Michael)
  5. Measuring the outcomes and impact of learning in museums, archives and libraries: the Learning Impact Research Project end of project paper (Hooper-Greenhill, Eilean et al)
  6. Consuming Underwear: Fashioning Female Identity (Tsaousi, Christiana)
  7. Facebook, social integration and informal learning at university: ‘It is more for socialising and talking to friends about work than for actually doing work’ (Madge, Clare et al)
  8. Financial Development, Economic Growth and Stock Market Volatility: Evidence from Nigeria and South Africa (Ndako, Umar Bida)
  9. Optimal Number of Response Categories in Rating Scales: Reliability, Validity, Discriminating Power, and Respondent Preferences (Preston, Carolyn C. et al)
  10. Teaching presentation skills to undergraduates: Students’ evaluations of a workshop course. (Colman, Andrew M.)

Nice to see a few new titles appearing again this month, along with some continuing popular items.  In terms of countries that have been accessing Leicester’s research only a little change.

  1. United Kingdom
  2. United States
  3. India
  4. Germany
  5. Australia
  6. China
  7. Canada
  8. Italy
  9. France
  10. Malaysia

Posted in Leicester Research Archive | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

6000th Record added to the LRA

Posted by gazjjohnson on 25 February, 2011

6000 AwardCupSound the fanfares!  I’m delighted to announce that we’ve added the 6,000th record to the Leicester Research Archive this week. 

Since the LRA is currently growing at around 1,600 items a year thanks to the hard work of Rob, Margaret and Valérie I’d expect we’ll easily see the 7,000 record this year (and with the implementation of the IRIS project perhaps even the 20,000th record!)

Posted in Leicester Research Archive | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Visit to South Leicestershire College

Posted by selinalock on 12 November, 2010

On Wednesday I represented the University Library at the College-University of Leicester Network (CULN) Librarians meeting. This meeting was hosted by Lesley John at South Leicestershire College, and we got a tour of the new College building, as you can see from the photos below.

South Leicestershire College 5


The new building brings all their departments together in one place, where they were previoulsy on several campuses. Including those such as construction (below). Each subject has their own teaching area or Pod, which includes an area where the students can drop in to use computers or do group work.

South Leicestershire College 4



Lesley told us that the library being integrated into the new building has meant more visits from students and staff, including harder to reach users.

South Leicestershire College 3



South Leicestershire College 2



South Leicestershire College

Posted in Meetings, Service Delivery, Wider profession | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Most used repository items for September 2010

Posted by gazjjohnson on 1 October, 2010

Here are the top 10 accessed items on the LRA in the past month

  1. Lead-free soldering alloys: microstructure optimization for electronic applications. Belyakov, Sergey  (Thesis)
  2. Saint Christopher Wall Paintings in English and Welsh Churches, c.1250-c.1500. Pridgeon , Eleanor Elizabeth (Thesis)
  3. Advanced control of photovoltaic converters. Liu. Ying (Thesis)
  4. Thai celebrity culture and the Bangkok teenage audience.  Thapthiang, Nuwan (Thesis)
  5. The Impact of Labour Turnover: Theory and Evidence from UK Micro-Data Garino. Gaia et al (Report)
  6. Human Rights in Turkey: A Comparative Perspective on Violation and Resolution. Straw, David William Matthew (Thesis)
  7. Succinct DOM. Delpratt, O’Neil et al (Conference Paper)
  8. A Study of Solidification Structure Evolution during Investment Casting of Ni-based Superalloy for Aero-Engine Turbine Blades. Dai, Huijuan (Thesis)
  9. Electrofinishing of metals using eutectic based ionic liquids. Abbott, A.P. et al (Article)
  10. Effects of Long-Term High Temperature Exposure on the Microstructure of Haynes Alloy 230. Veverková, Jana (Thesis)

What is notable is the high proportion of theses getting a heady use on the repository – they are around 10% of the collection as a total, but unlike the 44% full-text items as a whole for the LRA, around 99.9% of theses on the repository are available in full text.  They’re also a unique research resource that is otherwise very much underused.  In contrast theses from Leicester on Ethos appear to be used around 1/10 as often, which is perhaps not a big surprise given the requirement to register before accessing any of their content.

Meanwhile the top countries accessing the LRA last month were as follows (no change from last month):

  1. UK
  2. USA
  3. India
  4. Australia
  5. Germany

Posted in Leicester Research Archive, Open Access, Research Support | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Most used repository items for August 2010

Posted by gazjjohnson on 8 September, 2010

Here are the top 10 accessed items on the LRA in the past month

  1. The Impact of Labour Turnover: Theory and Evidence from UK Micro-Data Garino. Gaia et al (Report)
  2. Advanced control of photovoltaic converters. Liu. Ying (Thesis)
  3. Lead-free soldering alloys: microstructure optimization for electronic applications. Belyakov, Sergey  (Thesis)
  4. Electrofinishing of metals using eutectic based ionic liquids. Abbott, A.P. et al (Article)
  5. Social inclusion, the museum and the dynamics of sectoral change. Sandell, Richard  (Article)
  6. Human Rights in Turkey: A Comparative Perspective on Violation and Resolution. Straw, David William Matthew (Thesis)
  7. Succinct DOM. Delpratt, O’Neil et al (Conference Paper)
  8. Writing up and presenting qualitative research in family planning and reproductive health care. Pitchforth, Emma (Article)
  9. A Study of Solidification Structure Evolution during Investment Casting of Ni-based Superalloy for Aero-Engine Turbine Blades. Dai, Huijuan (Thesis)
  10. Saint Christopher Wall Paintings in English and Welsh Churches, c.1250-c.1500. Pridgeon , Eleanor Elizabeth (Thesis)

Once again all the entries in this list are full text resources, and given that the LRA recently achieved a 44% Full-text content this is perhaps less surprising.  The top countries accessing the LRA last month were as follows:

  1. UK
  2. USA
  3. India
  4. Australia
  5. Germany

Posted in Leicester Research Archive | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

All about OTTERS – a day on open educational resources

Posted by gazjjohnson on 3 September, 2010

Today I went down to the BDRA to attend a day on the OTTER project and OERs (open educational resources/repositories).  Educational object repositories are a little to the left of my working experience, so this was a great opportunity to find out a little more.  The aim of the day was to give an overview of OTTER and OERs in a broader sense.

We began by seeking to define what an OER was – something that could be reused, re-purposed, freely available, and discrete (not embedded within an environment).  The primary concerns over using them are currency, sustainability and quality control.  IPR/licensing to use/reuse is also an issue – especially third party rights of contents embedded within items.  Interestingly there is a lot of use of these objects by Leicester students for their revision, not simply those produced at Leicester.  Noted that MIT with their Open Courseware have been leading in this field for at least 12 years.

(Incidentally my favourite learning object is on  Kongregate – a game that teaches cellular physiology.)

OTTER is mounted on PLONE, and of course JORUM Open is more well known – as this links to OERs in all kinds of teaching environments. OTTER over-delivered on their target credits material – almost 500 credits worth of material.  Also the CORRE framework for creating and evaluating OERs.

CORRE

We started looking at Content gathering, and IPR/ownership questions were noted – the Uni generally owns copyright in OERs created here, but it was noted there are some cases where this might actually not be as cut and dried.  So OTTER worked with people where this wasn’t going to be a problem.  Even after the gathering there were questions over IPR and that some depts seemed to misunderstand what had been agreed to be supplied.  To get around this the BDRA devised a memorandum of understanding that was an agreement as to what partner depts would supply.  Noted that knowledge of copyright, let alone creative commons was poorly understood by the academic community and that education in this respect is needed.

Next is the Content screening – need to do some assessment of the content before you can decide that it is suitable for conversion into a OER.  OTTER used indicative questions to perform this analysis.  Interesting points about transnational issues over language and spelling were raised.  The amount of local references within OERs was an issue too – OTTER thought it was better to remove them and make them more generic, although other institutions didn’t always agree with this viewpoint – saying users could see past the local references to the reusable model underneath.

Then there is Openness – and the difference between creative commons and copyright.  In South America for example if it’s on the Web the normal assumption, even in the academic sphere, is that it is public domain and rights free.  The question of significant change to create a new object (and how much work is needed to demonstrate this) was raised.  Noted, like the LRA, that OTTER was very rigorous with copyright unlike some of the other projects – and had a series of indicative questions to be asked before an object could be progressed (developed with the consultation of Tania, our Copyright Administrator)

Next transformation – which is about enhancing the existing teaching materials as it becomes a OER, effectively making it an object independent of other resources that can be used on its own.  It may require restructuring – en.g. a lecture may be designed to work in a certain context, but as an OER its structure will need to be re-examined.

Then we looked at formatting and standardisation, making sure that final file formats are appropriate and openable by as wide a range of end users as possible.  It is also about making sure that metadata, and embedded metadata within the OER is  appropriate.  This was a manual process.  There was quite a discussion around the use of iTunesU and YouTube as alternative locations for mounting some OERs, the advantage being the discoverability would be enhanced by their search tools and greater visibility to a broader audience.  however, in contrast downloading of some objects can be restricted on these services, unlike from your own OER where you can control this more.

Now in Sahm’s words we move into a fashion parade – or Reuse and Repurpose – thinking about the end users and how they will be using it.  So these are questions to ask the various groups, although you can use your own in-house team to go through the tool kit questions.  Noted how they validated the materials by running it past real user groups e.g. EMALinc event with librarians.

Finally there is Evidence – this is about the impact and what is the value to teachers and learners around the wold, how do we measure it?  Senior management is more interested in evidence of impact, but as a teacher you will be more interested in the anecdotal evidence from learners on how these resources have helped in their learning experience.  like the LRA they use Google Analytics to track the quantitative data.  However, after all this effort and only 9 people use a resource the question of “worth” arises.  Hard to demonstrate what people get out of it – or what they would have not got, had the resource not existed.  Talked about MIT taking 10 years to demonstrate worth of their Open Courseware site. Akin to libraries making many materials available that few people use – but if they weren’t there, it would have diminished someone’s learning experience.

Applying CORRE

At this point we closed for lunch. After lunch we looked at some demos of objects in the Leicester OER, including a video with some upside down bits.  Following this we applied the CORRE framework to our own teaching examples – in my group’s case Marta from SDSS’ session on evaluating evidence.  We touched on the need to redesign teaching session objects from the ground up, if they were to fit through the CORRE framework – as they stand there is too little context to make them work alone, or too much referencing to other materials.

Finally the day reflected on how OERs and designing for openness has impacted on the work of the BDRA.  In particular thinking about stuff they are designing with this in mind from the start; alongside designing for the student.  They ask themselves “Can we make it open and can we enhance visibility for ourselves and our work through making it into an open resource?”

——–

Overall this was an enjoyable and engaging day, and the chance to think about CORRE I think could have filled an entire day if we’d worked through it methodically.  Even though I don’t do that much teaching these days I found plenty to think about, and look forward to future engagements with the BDRA.

Slides will be available on the OTTER sige, along with the podcast from the day (with the odd audible comment from me on it).

Posted in Open Access, Projects, Subject Support | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

UKCoRR Meeting – University of Leicester

Posted by gazjjohnson on 19 February, 2010

Today we’re hosting repository managers from across the UK, and I’m going to attempt to keep up with the key points of the event here as the day goes on.

10.30: Jen Delasalle (Warwick) and Louise Jones (Leicester) opening the event.

10.40: Jen is standing down as UKCoRR Chair, oh no.  Wonder if I should run? Or maybe I should let someone else go for it.

10.42: RCUK looking to set up a central system to record their research outputs.  So does this mean we need a CRIS as well or is this taking over from local recording of research?

10.45: Discussing remit of group and membership criteria, and the elephant in the room of funding the longer term development of UKCoRR.  Should we pass the hat round each meeting?  Always tricky – once you have funding you are beholden to your funders, be they members or institutional and can be called to account.  Would this change the organisation too much?

10.50: Looking more at the RCUK outputs and capture, and the role of the repository.

10.55: Journal TOCs project – an API drawing on 13,000 journal outputs.  Nick Shephard (aka @MrNick on twitter) will be talking about a project related to this later on this morning.  Idea is to allow searching for publications for local authors, which is useful – but you need to build a tool to exploit the API, we’d ned someone else to build us the tool.  Perhaps this is what Mr Nick will be going to do for us all?

10.58: Role of publishers and repository managers working together with authors.  And the idea of publishers selling us metadata – erm, no thanks.

11.00 Nicky Cashman (Aber) now talking about her work at CADIR and Aberystwyth. Her main role is advocacy around the university.  Noted that UKCoRR now has 182 members, impressive – when’s our three day conference in Hastings then?  She’s gone on to give us an idea of how much stuff they now have in their repository.  first mention for Webometrics – which is interesting as Nicky and I were discussing this last night; how much do we really trust their data – even if senior management love it when we rise up the tables.

11.15: Talking about Bartrum and the Seals in Medieval Wales (SiMeW) project.  Interesting that Aber and CADIR are more embedded within their departments – is this due to the size of the institution being smaller than Leicester?  I’ve heard this comment from other unis with smaller academic numbers that it has been easier for them to work together with their academics directly.

11.20: Talking Ethos and mandates for theses.  Something I’ll be talking about here at Leicester later on this morning.  Currently the’re an opt in institution for thesis deposits, so I can understand the difficulties they must face.  They are a first requester pays organisation for theses, which I think is going to an increasingly popular choice for institutions, and increasingly unpopular choice for readers.

11.25: Aber is doing a survey on ethesis deposit mandates, comment from Southampton that they (like Leicester) are an opt-out mandate institution.

11.30: Breaking for tea.  After this Nick Shepard and then me are on. Not quite sure I can present and blog at the same time so might have to fill that bit in post-hoc.

11.55: Nick and Wendy Luker from Leeds Met talking about the Bibliosight Project (querying Web of Science from the desktop).  JISC RI project .  Uses Thomson Reuter’s Web of Science Web Services (WSLite/WoSAPI) – sadly live demo hasn’t worked out for today, but thankfully Nick has a back up to show us.  Idea is to down load and autopopulate the repository with data from the WoS.  They aim to use it to promote deposit from and tie this into the REF.

12.10: Distracted by sorting out network keys, so will have to look at Nick’s presentation later.  However, he’s now giving us a screen capture demo of how the queries work, which I assume we’ll be able to view later as well.  Plan is to take the data out (as XML) and convert using SWORD into repository ingest.

12.13: Readiness for REF, looking at the wider issue of data capture (R4R), from) Les Carr of Southampton.  Questions about how this works into the workflows of the repository e.g. with so many records downloaded how do you get them in, authenticated and cleanly.

12.15: Some questions still outstanding – see Nick’s presentation.

12.20: Off to do my talk….

12.55: And I’m done.  Got some laughs in the right place, which was good.  Interesting comment from Gill Hall (Herts) that I could have just as easily have been telling her story as a repository manager.  That’s the good thing from UKCoRR, it really is the best community to belong to (well along with FIL) – everyone seems to share the same sort of problems and issues.

12.57: Dominic Tate is now up talking about the RSP, and their new series of events.  Sounds promising I hope I can get to some of those, as they’re good networking and training days.  There will be an event based on the forthcoming economics of open access report written by Alma Swann (June 17th probably).  Aimed at senior university management, rather than repository workers.

13.03: Talking about his work representing UKCoRR as well.  Including the JISC Persistent Identifier Working Group.

13.05: Important for repository mangers to work more closely with their research staff.

14.14: Post lunch and after a whistle-stop tour around the multi-awarding David Wilson Library, Hannah Payne from the Welsh Repository Network talked about their work.  They are launching two new objects on metadata use in repositories.  Also comments about non-standard collections (e.g. ceramics) and how to get them into repository, like UWIC has.  National Library of Wales looking to expand role in terms of collecting and storing digital items like theses, but question about how that relates to Ethos.

14.25: Integrating repositories with the REF and satisfying their requirements is something they still looking at; not a big surprise.  WRN is planning a repository and CRIS event, which will be held at Leeds Met University and will be open to all.

14.30: Question about a cross searching tool, stemming from WRN Google custom search tool.

14.31: Jane Smith now on talking Advanced SHERPA/RoMEO.  Demonstrating the new features of the search tool and the new output, that allows you to add in funder name.  Also records now no longer list all the funders automatically, can opt for none, 1 or all.  Remember DOAJ open access journals don’t all support archiving in a repository, and as these are now listed on RoMEO important to go and check their actually policies.

14.37: Jane now showing all publisher lists and the information you can garner from them.  It is now possible to even generate list of payments needed to make items open access.  S/RoMEO’s monthly updates are displayed on a regular webpage.

14.47: Peter Millington from SHERPA is now speaking about the RoMEO API.  Journals may appear in one or more data sources (Zetoc, DOAJ and the RoMEO journals database).  Different sources may list different publishers, and this can be a problem to identify which is the right one to use.  Who is the publisher, and who counts for copyright and whose’s policy takes priority?  There are some clear cut cases, but where two publishers appear to have the rights, then they may not be compatible.

14.55: Difference between current RoMEO and trial RoMEO being illustrated, I think right now though this looks like muddying the water until things roll out for use.

15.06: Moving onto coffee and copyright.

16.54: Finally back at my desk after cleaning up the room and sorting out the leftovers.  The copyright session was good, but I think we really needed a couple of hours to dig into some of the issues.  But useful all the same.  And with that UKCoRR is over again, which is a shame – I could have done with two more days to really get round and talk to all the people I needed to, and indeed wanted to.  Sorry if you were one of the ones I had to rush by today – I really would have loved to have time to talk to you all – but it’s been a hectic day.  More like this UKCoRR please.

Thanks to the committee and everyone involved in running today’s event – it was highly stimulating!  A twitter stream of comments on the day can be found here.

Posted in Leicester Research Archive, Meetings, Open Access | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »

Understanding Open Access and Bibliometrics – RSO/Library event

Posted by gazjjohnson on 11 February, 2010

As I mentioned previously the Research Support Office and the Library are running an event for academics and postgraduates here at Leicester on these hot topics.  Here’s a more detailed run down of the event programme.

Thursday 25th February 2010 2.00p.m. to 4.00p.m.
Lecture Theatre A, Physics Building

Overview of OA and OA at Leicester: Gareth J Johnson, Library
This session examines current developments in scholarly publication and open access, focussing on its impact on the Leicester academic community.

Research Funders’ OA mandates: Juliet Bailey, RSO
This session examines the policies of the major research funders on open access and outlines the implications for all researchers.

Q&A Session

An Introduction to Bibliometrics: Nancy Bayers, Library
This session introduces the concept of bibliometrics and its applications in evaluating research and planning for the Research Excellence Framework.

Bibliometrics in the REF: Juliet Bailey, RSO
This session examines how HEFCE proposes to use bibliometrics in the Research Excellence Framework and the changes proposed to scoring of outputs.

Q&A Session & Discussion

All sessions are open to all staff and research students but they are particularly suitable for academic staff and researchers. No registration is required.

Posted in Leicester Research Archive, Open Access, Research Support | Tagged: , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Research Focus Week 22-26th Feb programme

Posted by gazjjohnson on 4 February, 2010

You’ll see it soon on flyers and the e-bulletin – but just for interest here’s the programme for the Research Support Office’s forthcoming Research Focus Week.  The highlight naturally being Thursday afternoon!

Posted in Research Support | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »