UoL Library Blog

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Posts Tagged ‘planning’

Event review: Repositories and CRIS- Working Smartly together

Posted by gazjjohnson on 20 July, 2011

Yesterday I attended, along with Steve Loddignton (Research Support Office) and Stuart Wood (ITS), an event hosted by the RSP in their native Nottingham. The theme of the day was to take a look at the overlap in working, activities and priorities between repository managers and staff, and those working in the research offices. It was also a chance to meet with staff from the various repository software groups and CRIS suppliers too.  For us this was a useful chance to finally meet our Symplectic technical guru in the flesh, and to put a few more questions to him!

Despite being pitched to the two main groups, there were certainly a few more repository folks there on the day than research managers. That said there were enough from both camps to make for an effective dialogue and exchange of experience.  From my point of view I found it invaluable to attend in partnership with my two colleagues; each of us was able to get something different from the day.  For my own part it was a rewarding opportunity to see that Leicester is actually a good example of how to work closely on CRIS and repository activities; although I will admit we pale in comparison to the best practice example exemplified by Glasgow’s Enlighten.

The session from Simon Kerridge, speaking on behalf of ARMA that introduced the day was a valuable insight into the working life of a research manager.  I was pleased to see that they consider interactions with the repository to be third priority, behind HR and finance alone, which was most heartening.  For my own part I especially value the close working relationship the LRA team has establishing with our RSO over the years, and hope that through working together on IRIS that it will continue to develop.

It was also interesting to participate in the session facilitated by the RePOSIT project, once again looking at advocacy but also crucially interactions between the repository and research manager communities.  Personally events such as yesterday are vital so that we can all better understand the needs and challenges each face, along with our own especial priorities.  Steve and myself did take away quite a few ideas for communication and advocacy to the University of Leicester community that we will be feeding into the IRIS Communication plan for the coming month.  I’m looking forward to this chance to get out into our wonderful Leicester research community and demonstrate how IRIS can make their lives easier, and how the LRA can enable their research to be more widely read, cited and reused.

The other excellent talk that stuck home was from Valerie McCutcheon of Glasgow university’s research office.  It really did give a fantastic example of how a research office and repository team can unite over a core system.  She showed even where working practices may differ how the centralisation of the management of research data and publications can make for a smooth operation.  It also offers a greater possibility for development of new enhancements for the academic community established in partnership, rather than in isolation.  personally I believe it’s a model I think both the Library and our Research Office should look to emulate in many aspects.

There were other sessions, along with the chance to catch up with other repository managers working with Symplectic too, but for me these sessions were the ones that I came away thinking about.  This was a truly excellent day and my thanks the RSP for organising it, and all the speakers for their input to it.

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Posted in Leicester Research Archive, Open Access, Research Support | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Open access for new academics workshop

Posted by gazjjohnson on 16 September, 2009

I was approached last month by our Staff Development team to consider running a workshop for new academics on all the various aspects of open access.  Obviously I said yes, and followed up with the very helpful Derek Cox and Meera Warrier.  I gave them an overview of the sort of thing that we could include, and they went away to think about it.

Well they’ve come back now to give me the go ahead for December for a three hour workshop.  I’m rather delighted to be given this much time, but now I’m sitting down and thinking “How can I usefully fill this and shape it into a format that is both beneficial but objective at the same time”.  I’m immediately giving some thought to bringing in one of my colleagues as well, so it’s not just me droning on for the whole time (they do get a tea break).

I think I’m going to have to give this some very serious thought.  I’d like to include some hands on elements, but there seems little point in getting academics to search (say) RoMEO when we at the LRA do all the work on copyright for them.  But then exploring things like DOAJ, OpenDOAR, BASE, OAIster etc are likely to be of more direct interest to them.

I’m also going to have to tackle aspects of the REF and Funders requirements too.  I’m lucky in that we have a day event run by our Research Office in late October where a lot of these issues are going to be raised, discussed and presented by external speakers from the various bodies.  I’ll hopefully be able to crib elements from there.

At this stage in my planning I’m open to constructive suggestions though.

Posted in Leicester Research Archive, Open Access, Research Support, Training | Tagged: , , | 4 Comments »

Digital Library Strategy workshop – a review

Posted by gazjjohnson on 30 January, 2009

Joanne asked if I’d author a few thoughts on this morning’s workshop so here are my reflections.  As I didn’t take many notes you’ll all forgive me if I miss any points out – or perhaps you might like to add them in the comments.

The session was led by Ken Chad whom kicked the session off with the wider context of emegring technological and social development within which we in education work.  Whilst I was familier with some of the aspects, quite a few were real eye openers and I came away from the session with a list of books to track down and read (I’m reading Clay Shirky on the train this week).  He also made me think about getting a FlipVideo camera – before I remembered I already owned a pretty swanky HDD camcorder.

Our very own Richard Mobbs followed up with another excellent talk covering the tech and systems from a more education centric point of view, and again richly illustrated and presented.  Aside from sitting there and thinking “But if we need to support users with these devices and resources we need to become proficient users and exploiters of the resources ourselves.” there’s not a lot a can add here, except to say the statement “Everything Changes” has never seemed so apposite.

The second half of the session was my favourite bit, but then I’ve run and participated in so many conferences and workshops over the years that I love getting my teeth into a challenge*.  I did enjoy working with Team Yellow, though my one regret was we didn’t get to change teams and interact with a wider range of people in the room.  That said the format of 4 areas of challenges and our responses worked very well.  For the record the areas we were considering were:

  1. Content/Collections
  2. Infrastructure/processes
  3. Learning environments
  4. The role of librarians and library services

Our group started the way it intended to go on – bringing chaos to order; but in a fractal rather than dysfunctional kind of way.  We certainly debated, discussed and exchanged ideas at a high volume and velocity.  My apologies to any in the other group who may have been expecting a more thoughtful approach from us; but as was obvious from the number of post-its that went up we all had a lot to contribute.

So what now?  Well now is the hard part and for once I’m glad it’s not me that’s got to get my teeth into synthesising a plan from these ideas; and evaolving this into a straetgy.  That is a lot that we could do, much that we should, and perhaps even more to which we could aspire.  But the question is – which are the best options for us? 

That only time, planning and the wealth of experience possessed by the library and university staff will tell.  We’ve a long road of discovery and innovation ahead of us, and it might be a bumpy ride along the way.  But to failing to travel it is not an option.

*As I’ve noted elsewhere I’ve an activist kinesthetic learning style, which probably explains these things.

Posted in Service Delivery, Staff training, Web 2.0 & Emerging Technologies, Wider profession | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 6 Comments »